Just Another Day at the Office

Eggs and Bananas by Luna McCarthy

One of the first things I noticed and admired about Guatemalans when I arrived here almost 3 years ago, was how hard working so many of them are. These ladies, like so many others are working in the market, which means getting the children up in the mornings, cooking and eating breakfast, getting the kids either off to school or to Grandma’s house, or taking them with them to the market. The vendors sell all day, then leave between 3:00 and 5:00 or 6:00, depending on their location and/or business. If the vendors are women, they are going home to cook dinner, do the laundry (often by hand in the pilla) and clean their houses. Seeing these types of routines sometimes makes me think of the days when I used to complain that I had too much to do and didn’t have time to watch my favorite tv show when I wanted; how trivial! If you’re reading this post (obviously on a computer) you’ve got lots to be thankful for, as do I.

© 2011, Luna McCarthy. All rights reserved.

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  • Norm Kwallek

    Talking with a friend yesterday who lives in another state, he commented that his youngest boy had spent the last month as an interpreter in Guatemala working in a medical clinic. My friend said that it changed the boy, not so much the 12 hour days but the folk he translated for and what they told him about their lives. A young person has no way of knowing how good they have it till they are exposed to people who’s lives are much harder.

    • Luna McCarthy

      Very, very true Norm…I had a conversation years ago with a good friend who was a Czech immigrant to Canada and he stated that he believes that it should be mandatory for a University degree, that the student live in a culture (any culture that is vastly different than their own) for one year of their education, to see what other people’s lives are like…raises some interesting thoughts, that’s for sure!